Events

Spem in Alium at Spitalfields Festival

Spitalfields Festival has been postponed. We are hoping to reschedule dates in the Autumn and will update you with more news as soon as we can. All tickets already purchased remain valid for rescheduled dates. Please contact the relevant box office for a refund. 

 


The voices of Dunedin Consort and National Youth Chamber Choir of Great Britain combine in a concert which pivots on two works of epic scale.

Frequently hailed as one of the most astonishing pieces of choral music ever created, Tallis’s Spem in alium is a devotional motet for 40 separate voices interwoven to create an ever-shifting mosaic of sound. The audience will be surrounded by, and immersed in, song.

A contemporary response comes from Spitalfields Festival Curator Errollyn Wallen, with her maritime-themed When the Wet Wind Sings. The same forty voices take us on a sea-faring voyage across five centuries.

Pygmalion at Spitalfields Festival

Spitalfields Festival has been postponed. We are hoping to reschedule dates in the Autumn and will update you with more news as soon as we can. All tickets already purchased remain valid for rescheduled dates. Please contact the relevant box office for a refund. 

 


Festival Curator Kate Molleson presents Dunedin Consort performing Jean-Philippe Rameau’s sumptuous opera Pygmalion with a sensational cast accompanied by one of Scotland’s most daring young dancers, Claricia Parinussa.

Rameau’s opera tells the myth of Pygmalion, a talented sculptor who creates the image of his ideal woman in ivory. As the statue takes shape, Pygmalion becomes increasingly infatuated with it, much to the dismay of his fiancée Céphise. The sculptor appeals to the goddess Venus to bring his statue to life, and everyone’s fortunes are changed when la statue transforms, awakes – and dances.

An opera about power, gender, the myth of creative genius, narcissism, and image culture – an opera for our times.

In addition, cellist Lucy Railton responds to the drama of the work with her own compositions to open and close the concert.