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Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – The Stage Review

★★★★

George Hall, The Stage

“Wallen’s skilful score offers atmosphere, variety and some impressive characterisation and is finely sung and played in a performance founded on the excellent Baroque specialist Dunedin Consort under conductor John Butt; musical standards are high throughout.”

Read the full review here.

Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – The Times Review

Geoff Brown, The Times

“… there was the lively precision of John Butt’s Dunedin Consort, its period instruments regularly spiked with the electric guitars that signalled when Wallen had arrived and Purcell had left.”

Read the full review here.

Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – Planet Hugill Review

Robert Hugill, Planet Hugill

4.5/5 stars

“… breathtakingly daring yet intelligently done.”

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Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – The Economist Review

The Economist

“A conversation across centuries and styles… Dido’s Ghost hauntingly shows that so-called “period” instruments can, and should, play key parts in the music of today.”

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Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – Vox Carnyx

Keith Bruce, Vox Carnyx

“It is desirable beyond argument that Dido’s Ghost becomes a repertoire work.… Dunedin stalwart Matthew Brook has never been better than he is here… Nardus Williams as the supportive Belinda is also a powerful presence, and Scots mezzo Allison Cook is fearsome as Lavinia…”

Read the full review here.

Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – Bachtrack Review

★★★★

David Smythe, Bachtrack

“a dramatic and thrilling work… Purcell’s work is performed as a memory masque, not quite bookended by the new work as the ghosts take over and the operas collide at the end with an extraordinary and unexpected twist”

Read the full review here.

Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – The Guardian Review

★★★★

Fiona Maddocks, The Guardian

“Anyone who insists on Purcell pure might find the mix too challenging, yet this new work is bold and moving, a piercing reminder of how the past haunts the present. Dido’s celebrated lament is heard, but not as you expect it. With a conviction that transfixes, Aeneas himself now sings the plaintive, tolling utterance, to devastating effect.”

Read the full review here.