Messiah – The Arts Desk Review

★★★★

Simon Thompson, The Arts Desk

‘Almost every city in the UK has its annual Christmas Messiah, but there can’t be any as stylish or as polished as this one.’

Read the full review here.

Messiah – Planet Hugill Review

★★★★★

Robert Hugill, Planet Hugill

‘A superbly subtle account… the choruses were some of the best sung that I have ever come across in my nearly 50 years of attending Messiah performances.’

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Messiah – The Scotsman Review

★★★★★

David Kettle, The Scotsman

‘This was a fresh, searching Messiah, brisk and vivid, and delivered as if its ink was still wet.’

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Messiah – BachTrack Review

★★★★★

Benjamin Poore, BachTrack

‘Gutsy and vibrant… a huge ovation for a thrilling performance that gave this staple a vigorous makeover.’

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Yince a paradise – Seen and Heard International Review

Simon Thompson, Seen and Heard International

“The tightest blend and the most persuasive sense of communication, something that had me convinced throughout this programme, which spanned five centuries of choral music… the Dunedin singers created something magical”.

Read the full review here.

Lammermuir Festival – Madrigals of Love, Loss & War – The National Review

Mark Brown, The National

“The passionate commitment of the songs demands great dexterity, both of singers and musicians, and the Dunedin Consort has that virtuosic agility in spades.”

Read the full review here.

Lammermuir Festival – Madrigals of Love, Loss & War – The Guardian Review

★★★★

Rowena Smith, The Guardian

“… an interesting, imaginative programme brought to life in a vivid performance from the singers and instrumentalists of the Dunedin Consort.”

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Bremen Musikfest – Davide Penitente – OM Online Review

Oliver Strauch, OM Online

“clear, brilliant pianissimo and breathtaking forte passages, clarity in language and expression and musical precision…”

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Dido’s Ghost – Edinburgh International Festival – The Scotsman Review

★★★★★

Ken Walton, The Scotsman

“An intoxicating cocktail.”

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Dido’s Ghost – Edinburgh International Festival – The Herald Review

★★★★

Keith Bruce, The Herald

“There is no one hero in this work because it is an ensemble triumph, with conductor John Butt and the Dunedin Consort making a glorious success of Wallen’s clever mix of old and new music.”

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Dido’s Ghost – Edinburgh International Festival – Vox Carnyx Review

Ken Walton, Vox Carnyx

“At the emotional heart of Dido’s Ghost, however, is Matthew Brook’s towering portrayal of Aeneas, which, with Wallen’s and Stace’s evocative writing, invests in the character a human depth that Purcell opted not to explore to any great extent in his own opera.”

Read the full review here.

Dido’s Ghost – Buxton International Festival – The Guardian Review

★★★★

Flora Willson, The Guardian

“A beguiling tapestry of fragmentary quotations and knowing gestures to an earlier music language, overlaid with a contemporary sonic palette.”

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Dido’s Ghost – Buxton International Festival – The Arts Desk Review

★★★★★

Robert Beale, The Arts Desk

“It’s a stimulating piece of creation and adaptation, done to a very high standard indeed, and may even be remembered as one of the most striking and original artistic products of the Covid era.”

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Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – The Stage Review

★★★★

George Hall, The Stage

“Wallen’s skilful score offers atmosphere, variety and some impressive characterisation and is finely sung and played in a performance founded on the excellent Baroque specialist Dunedin Consort under conductor John Butt; musical standards are high throughout.”

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Dido’s Ghost – World Premiere at the Barbican – iNews Review

★★★★

Alexandra Coglan, iNews

“This is a bold reimagining of Purcell’s classic… All are superb, but it’s Matthew Brook’s Aeneas who carries the piece. The feckless charmer of Purcell’s origin here becomes wiser and sadder – finally a man worthy of the Lament, which he delivers with heart-stopping vulnerability and tenderness.”

Read the full review here.