Trevor Pinnock Interview

Meet renowned harpsichordist and conductor Trevor Pinnock, who directs Dunedin Consort for the first time next week in our performances of J.S. Bach’s Matthew Passion in Aberdeen and Edinburgh.


Can you remember your first experience of the Matthew Passion?

I well remember my introduction to parts of the Matthew Passion (in English!) as a choirboy at Canterbury Cathedral. I was especially taken by the aria ‘Jesu saviour, I am thine’ (Ich will dir mein Herze schenken).

Having been a cathedral chorister, do you feel your your background as a singer has informed your harpsichord playing and direction in any particular way?

The daily training at the choir school laid the foundation of my life’s work. The discipline of listening and reacting to other vocal parts and being aware of how all parts combine to the produce the whole work was instilled in me, and has been of enormous benefit as a conductor and soloist. 

You’ve already performed the Matthew Passion a few times this year; it clearly doesn’t get boring for you! What do you think keeps the work fresh and appealing to contemporary audiences? 

This year I have performed the Matthew Passion at the National Arts Centre, Ottawa where I was Music Director many years ago, and at the Royal Academy of Music. These were strongly contrasting performances. The first was with the combined choirs totalling 80 singers, and the second with singers specially chosen to make two choirs of 12. Solos were shared between the choir members.

Now there is an even greater contrast as I lead the Dunedin Consort’s established way of performing the Passion with single voices and instruments. I feel honoured to be asked to do this as I am a great admirer of John Butt and his ensemble. This is an exciting challenge for me. People may wonder how I can feel happy to do such contrasted performances? The answer is simple — the substance of the work and the consequent emotions it portrays are constant but our mode of transport is different. The St Matthew Passion embodies deep truth which is felt by those of Christian belief and those of none. It is a welcome stabiliser and inspiration in our unsettled age. 

Have you worked with any of our singers before? 

At the Royal Academy of Music, Lina Dambrauskaite sang in chorus 1 and sang the aria ‘Aus Liebe’. On the basis of this, I invited her to join the consort for our performance. I have also worked with Miriam Allan, who was my soprano soloist in performances of Messiah in Canada with Les Violins du Roi. Hugo Hymas came to London to sing to me recently and we had an enjoyable few hours of Evangelist. I am very much looking forward to meeting the other singers.

What are you most looking forward to, coming to Scotland to work with Dunedin Consort for the first time?  

I have always enjoyed working in Scotland whether with orchestra, in chamber ensembles or as a soloist. It will be a pleasure to perform at The Queen’s Hall, where I have not played since the 1980s — and I am very much looking forward to enjoying the newly renovated Music Hall in Aberdeen.

Away from the harpsichord and your conducting activities, how do you spend your time these days?

I love to spend family time with my grandson who is nearly three years old. There is so much to learn from the little people.


Dunedin Consort performs Bach’s Matthew Passion twice next week:

Music Hall, Aberdeen — Thursday 18 April, 7:00pm


The Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh
— Friday 19 April, 7:00pm

Dunedin Consort announces new Chief Executive

The board of Dunedin Consort is delighted to announce the appointment of Jo Buckley as its new Chief Executive, effective from March 2019. Jo will take over from Alfonso Leal del Ojo, whose appointment as the new Chief Executive of The English Concert was recently announced.

Jo joined Dunedin Consort as Head of Artistic Planning in January 2018 and quickly became a key part of the organisation’s senior management. She will be a familiar face for many of the group’s regular audience members and supporters, and is widely known both in Scotland and across the UK’s classical music sector.

Sir Muir Russell, Chairman of Dunedin Consort, commented:

‘I and my fellow Directors are very pleased to be making this appointment. We have seen at first hand, in Scotland, in London and on a number of engagements in Europe just how well Jo has managed the work of Dunedin, and we have full confidence that she will excel in the role of Chief Executive.

The programme for the year ahead, in Scotland and internationally, that Jo has helped to put together since she joined us, is varied and exciting and provides a brilliant start to her tenure. We look forward to supporting her and her colleagues, as well as all Dunedin’s family of excellent performers, as she takes the Consort’s work forward.’

Jo Buckley said:

‘Working with Dunedin Consort over the past year has been a hugely rewarding experience and an enormous pleasure. Few groups are as widely admired, or as warmly embraced, and it is a real honour to be given the opportunity to lead the organisation as it begins its next chapter.

Alfonso Leal del Ojo leaves behind him a thriving and vibrant ensemble at the peak of its powers, and I know that with this wonderful cast of musicians and John Butt’s unique artistic direction, we will go on to achieve still greater accolades in the years to come. With the support of the board, and with the backing of Dunedin Consort’s army of friends and supporters, I look forward to many more years of inspiring music-making – and to reaching many more listeners both at home in Scotland and across the world.’

Children’s Messiah 2018

Our Chief Executive

On behalf of the Board and the management team of the Dunedin Consort I congratulate Alfonso Leal del Ojo on his appointment as Chief Executive of the English Concert, announced today. We wish him well in this challenging new role.

We are sorry to be losing Alfonso – since 2010 he has played a key role in shaping Dunedin to be the international success story it is today. He leaves us with a strong forward programme, a fine recording history, and good relationships in Scotland, the UK and internationally.

In John Butt and Dunedin colleagues, and in the body of musicians who perform with us frequently, we have a strong team to maintain our achievements. We will be looking to appoint a successor who can help take Dunedin to new heights.  That process will start early in the New Year.

Muir Russell, Chairman
chairman@dunedin-consort.org.uk

Festival de Torroella de Montgrí

The Soundworld of Rembrandt

Recording Handel’s Samson

#RPSCountdown: our highlights from 2017

As the classical music world gears up for the Royal Philharmonic Society Awards on Wednesday 9th May, we have been looking back at our favourite moments from 2017 and celebrating the many reasons why Dunedin is shortlisted in the Ensemble category From Edinburgh to Leipzig, Waltershausen to London, we look back on an extraordinary year.

2017 Highlights

  1. Where else could we start but with our BBC Proms debut from 20 August 2017, a performance of Bach’s John Passion ‘that shed new light on the work by carefully contextualising it’ (Guardian).
  2. In June 2017 we performed in the magnificent Nikolaikirche as part of Leipzig Bachfest. What a venue – and what a spectacular occasion.

    Bows in Leipzig

  3. On 5 August 2017 we had the honour of opening Edinburgh International Festival’s series at The Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh with a programme exploring connections between Schütz and Monteverdi. The Scotsman enjoyed it as much as we did! ‘Delivered with the Consort’s typical joie de vivre and flourish’ (Scotsman)
  4. In September 2017 we ticked a huge item off our bucket list when we traveled to Waltershausen,Germany with Iestyn Davies to perform a programme of Bach and Handel on an original Bach organ.

    Waltershausen

  5. In April 2017 we enjoyed our first collaboration with Kristian Bezuidenhout, who directed from the harpsichord in three Matthew Passion performances across Scotland. ‘The solo instrumental playing in this performance was unwaveringly stunning’ (Herald)
  6. September 2017 saw the release of our Monteverdi Vespers 1610 recording, which has earned a glut of 5 star reviews. ‘Stripped back performances that are fresh and luminous, lithe and alive’ (Herald – Top 20 Classical Albums of 2017)
  7. In April 2017 we were thrilled to be part of James Runcie’s BBC Radio 4 drama exploring how Bach’s Matthew Passion was written, composed, rehearsed and performed in the build-up to its first performance in Leipzig on Good Friday 1727.

7 days, 7 highlights from 2017, 7 reasons why we have been nominated for an RPS Ensemble Award.

Dunedin Consort shortlisted for a Royal Philharmonic Society Award

Dunedin Consort has been shortlisted for an RPS award, one of the most prestigious in the UK music scene, in the Ensemble category.

Over 50 musicians, ensembles and organisations nationwide are in contention for this year’s awards, which celebrate outstanding music making in 2017. The shortlists reveal a kaleidoscope of musical talent, invention and imagination, whether in the concert hall or on the opera stage, in the community or online, in written word, film or for the first time, via virtual reality. From nearly 400 nominations in 13 categories, the 65 independent, expert jurors have chosen this year’s shortlisted nominations.

Creative Scotland restores Regular Funding to Dunedin Consort

Today we learned that Dunedin Consort is to be restored to Creative Scotland’s Regular Funding programme, along with four other companies from the theatre sector. This follows a meeting on Friday, at which Creative Scotland’s board decided to invest 2.6 million from other targeted funds into the RFO programme. Having spoken strongly of our surprise and disappointment at being cut from the RFO network, we are delighted that the decision has now been taken to renew our funding for a further three years.

Since sharing the news that Dunedin Consort was to have its funding cut a fortnight ago, we have received an overwhelming swell of support both from the public and from our colleagues across the arts and cultural sectors. We would like to thank everyone that voiced their support and forwarded their concerns both to Creative Scotland and to Scotland’s Secretary for Culture. There is little doubt that this support played a significant role in Creative Scotland’s decision to increase investment in the RFO programme.

This funding will enable us to deliver our programme of performances and events across Scotland, including the planned expansion of our outreach programme within schools and with young performers. We firmly believe that Dunedin Consort occupies a unique place in the Scottish music landscape and look forward to another three years of exceptional music-making, buoyed by the backing of Creative Scotland.

Alfonso Leal del Ojo
Chief Executive

Points made in representations to CEO, Creative Scotland

Public statements of support for Dunedin Consort

Statement from Dunedin Consort on Creative Scotland funding

Dunedin Consort’s application for Regular Funding from Creative Scotland has been unsuccessful. This decision is particularly unfortunate in the wake of the Scottish Government’s recent commitment towards Creative Scotland, offsetting the decline in Lottery funding. We presented an ambitious and wide-ranging programme of activity in our Business Plan for 2018-21, which was highly commended by Creative Scotland’s assessors. Despite being recommended for funding, our application was refused by the Music Team at portfolio level because ‘other organisations more fully met the strategic needs of the sector’.

As Scotland’s leading specialist period instrument ensemble, and the most decorated of any Scottish music company (with two Gramophone awards, a Grammy nomination and two Scottish Album of the Year nominations to our name), this comes as a significant disappointment. In the landscape of Scotland’s musical culture, no other organisation focuses on this vital area of the repertoire, uniting excellence in scholarship and performance to explore new ways of encouraging listener engagement. Dunedin Consort has achieved great success with very limited resources. Our artistic output, recognition in the industry and impact in the international and national music landscape in proportion to the level of funding and our turnover, cannot be matched by any other music company in Scotland.

Creative Scotland has in the past been very supportive of our work. Its funding currently accounts for 20% of our annual turnover (where other music organisations receive support between 46-74%) representing exceptional value for public money and without it, Dunedin Consort will be forced to capitalise more on its opportunities elsewhere. This, in turn, will reduce the performance opportunities for our Scottish audiences and supporters, including the valuable outreach work we undertake in schools and with young performers. After the enormous success of our recent performances at the BBC Proms and the Edinburgh International Festival, our national and international profile continues to develop apace – only yesterday we confirmed a further seven concerts in our residency at London’s Wigmore Hall, which sits alongside residencies at the Misteria Paschalia festival in Krakow and the Handel Halle Festpiele in Germany in 2018, and tours planned for Spain, France, Bolivia, Brazil, the USA and others over the next three years. Without support at home, this international impact – something vital to Scotland’s reputation – must be at risk. What is certainly clear, is that the lack of Creative Scotland commitment will mean that it will not be possible to match this international demand with performances on home soil.

We now have the option to apply for limited project funding through Creative Scotland, accessing a funding stream that is consistently oversubscribed and which brings with it the uncertainty of not being able to plan well into the future. Our board will need to consider how this will affect the future of the company as a whole, and whether – over the coming years – the impact of poor Scottish national support will ultimately deprive Scotland of one of its greatest cultural assets and ambassadors.

Alfonso Leal del Ojo
Chief Executive

John Butt announced as Residing Director of Krakow’s Misteria Paschalia Festival 2018

Fast developing a reputation as one of Europe’s leading Baroque festivals, Krakow’s Misteria Paschalia Festival has announced John Butt as its Residing Director for 2018.

The 2018 festival will focus on music from the British Isles, with the Dunedin Consort playing a central role in a series of concerts in March and April.

The Dunedin Consort will open the Festival with a performance of the London version of Handel’s Messiah on 26 March and return to give a performance of Handel’s Samson on 1 April, before closing the Festival with a programme of arias by Purcell with Ian Bostridge on 2 April.

Read The Herald article about John’s appointment here.

For more details about the festival and to view the full programme of events, visit the Festival website.

PROM 49 – Congregational Chorales

Are you coming to our PROM this coming Sunday, 20th of August 2017? We would love if as many people in the audience joined the musicians on stage in the congregational chorales that would have formed part of the Vespers liturgy. We extracted these chorales from the Vopelius 1685 Leipzig hymn book.

There will be a short rehearsal at 19.15 ahead of the performance. Looking forward to this enormously!

Click on the link below to download the songsheet.

If you still have not bought your tickets, here is the link!